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Posts Tagged ‘Hymns’

The high price, of course, was the sacrificial death of Jesus who willingly gave his life to save us from sin’s destruction, and forgave our sins. (I Cor. 6:20; 7:23; Eph. 1:7)

Because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—for it is by grace you have been saved. And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus, in order that in the coming ages he might show the incomparable riches of his grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus. (Eph. 2:4-7)

In light of such wonderful love, mercy, grace, and kindness, how should we then respond?

Gloria Gaither, one of the most prolific Christian composers today, answered that question when she wrote the inspiring lyrics in “I Then Shall Live,” and set it to the beautiful hymn tune, Finlandia.

Please listen and allow the Holy Spirit to speak to you and bless you.

 

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Here are three hymns whose words and music will help you prepare your heart, mind, and spirit throughout Easter week. Listen to them several times over the next few days and linger over the lyrics, allowing the Lord to speak to you through the words and melodies.

***

The first hymn, “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross,” was written by the prolific English hymn composer Isaac Watts in 1707 as a way of expressing his heartfelt thanks for the amazing love of Christ who willingly died for our sins on the cross. Isaac’s words and music have proven to be timeless and inspiring to Christian believers for more than three hundred years:

When I survey the wondrous cross
on which the prince of glory died,
my richest gain I count but loss,
and pour contempt on all my pride.

Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
save in the death of Christ, my God;
all the vain things that charm me most,
I sacrifice them to his blood.

See, from his head, his hands, his feet,
sorrow and love flow mingled down.
Did e’er such love and sorrow meet,
or thorns compose so rich a crown?

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
that were an offering far too small;
love so amazing, so divine,
demands my soul, my life, my all.

***

The second, “What Wondrous Love Is This,” is an early American folk hymn that was first sung by worshipers in the Appalachian region of our country between the late 1800s and early 1900s, and then published in a hymnal in 1835. The author and composer are unknown.

May these simply stated lyrics and plaintive tune minister to you as you consider the depth of Christ’s love for us as he bore our sins on the cross.

What wondrous love is this, O my soul, O my soul,
what wondrous love is this, O my soul!
What wondrous love is this that caused the Lord of bliss
to bear the dreadful curse for my soul, for my soul,
to bear the dreadful curse for my soul!

When I was sinking down, sinking down, sinking down,
when I was sinking down, sinking down, sinking down;
when I was sinking down beneath God’s righteous frown,
Christ laid aside his crown for my soul, for my soul,
Christ laid aside his crown for my soul!

To God and to the Lamb, I will sing, I will sing,
to God and to the Lamb I will sing!
To God and the Lamb, who is the great “I AM,”
while millions join the theme, I will sing, I will sing,
while millions join the theme, I will sing.

And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing on, I’ll sing on,
and when from death I’m free, I’ll sing on!
And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing and joyful be,
and through eternity I’ll sing on, I’ll sing on,
and through eternity I’ll sing on!

***

The third hymn, “The Power of the Cross” was written in 2005 by Keith Getty, from Belfast, Northern Ireland, and Stuart Townend, a British songwriter and worship leader. They write and compose modern hymns that are theologically rich and teach the Christian faith in a style of music that unites people of different traditions and generations. Keith and his wife, Kristyn, presently live and perform in the U.S.

Oh, to see the dawn
of the darkest day:
Christ on the road to Calvary.
Tried by sinful men,
torn and beaten, then
nailed to a cross of wood.

CHORUS:
This, the pow’r of the cross:
Christ became sin for us;
took the blame, bore the wrath-
we stand forgiven at the cross.

Oh, to see the pain
written on Your face,
bearing the awesome weight of sin.
Ev’ry bitter thought,
ev’ry evil deed
crowning Your bloodstained brow.

Now the daylight flees;
now the ground beneath
quakes as its Maker bows His head.
Curtain torn in two,
dead are raised to life;
“Finished!” the vict’ry cry.

Oh, to see my name
written in the wounds,
for through Your suffering I am free.
Death is crushed to death;
life is mine to live,
won through Your selfless love.

FINAL CHORUS:
This, the pow’r of the cross:
Son of God–slain for us.
What a love! What a cost!
We stand forgiven at the cross.

***

May these hymns draw you close to our Lord and Savior and prepare you for your own spiritual journey through Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the glorious celebration on Easter Sunday. And may the grace and peace of our Lord Jesus bless you abundantly.

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